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The Griffin Room is open to the public & we want YOU to join us for our LAST WEEKEND of Oktoberfest!

Join us for Beers & Cheers! All the German Fair you can think of will be provided including Schnitzle, Sauerbraten, Kassler Riptchen, Potato Pancakken, ant z Apple Strudel, & German beer!

Please make your reservations & have an OOPMA good time!

Every Friday & Saturday in October | Dates Include:

October 26th & 27th

Brooks Koepka’s four-shot win at the CJ Cup propelled him to No. 1 in the Official World Golf Ranking for the first time. It also created a different kind of first in OWGR history.

Koepka kept alive a musical chairs situation in the top spot the likes that has never been seen before. For the first time since the ranking’s inception in 1986, the current top four (Koepka, Dustin Johnson, Justin Rose and Justin Thomas) is comprised of players who all made it to No. 1 in the same year.

“It’s amazing to go World No. 1 on a win,” Koepka said after pulling away from the field in South Korea. “I think is something I’ve always wanted to do. I always wanted to earn my way to No. 1 in the world, and I felt like if I played and won, that would be exactly how I could draw it up. To do that this week has been special.”

It’s also just the second time that four different players ascended to No. 1 in the same year. The only other instance occurred in 1997 when Greg Norman, Tom Lehman, Tiger Woods, and Ernie Els all spent time in the top spot.

Overall, Koepka, 28, is the 23rd player to be No. 1 in the OWGR and the 11th in the past eight years.

Source: www.golfdigest.com

Our Fall Membership Special Is For a Limited Time ONLY!

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Join Us At The Griffin Room For A Comedy Show!

J.T. Newton is veteran comic of many years, starting his career in Wash.,D.C. where he worked with Patton Oswald, Wanda Sykes, Martin Lawrence and officially brought Dave Chappelle to the stage for his first professional performance.  His humor comes straight from the heart about the human experience, oh how funny life can be when you use humor as a coping mechanism. High energy observations make for big fun when J.T. Newton hits the stage. Come join the fun!

It is arguably one of the few sports terms believed to be named after a person, and with ramifications beyond the border of a course and into politics and daily life.

You don’t have to be a golfer to enjoy the benefits of a Mulligan – the term is now widely used to describe any “do-over,” or second chance after initial failure.

Of course, the rules of golf forbid the Mulligan, though it’s become part of the game. Some golfers apply their own “rules” that the Mulligan will be in “play” once per round, or just on the No. 1 tee.

So, where and when did the Mulligan begin in golf? Well, that depends.

The USGA, and supported by research by GriffGolf.com, found the Mulligan became rooted in the game’s lexicon sometime between the late 1920s and mid-1930s. During that period, Canadian-born amateur David Bernard Mulligan had established himself as a prominent member of clubs that included Winged Foot in Mamaroneck, N.Y.

In the late 1920s, Mulligan had a regular club foursome, which he often drove to the course in a 1920s vintage Briscoe, a touring car.

Once on the first tee, the story goes, his partners allowed him to hit a second ball after mishitting his drive. Mulligan complained that his hands were still numb after driving rough roads and a bumpy Queen Victoria Jubilee Bridge (now Victoria Bridge).

Mulligan joined Winged Foot Golf Club sometime between 1932 and 1933. A generation later, in July 1985, journalist Don Mackintosh interviewed Mulligan for a column, “Around the Sport Circuit.”

Said Mulligan: “I was so provoked with myself that, on impulse, I stooped over and put down another ball. The other three looked at me with considerable puzzlement, and one of them asked, ‘What are you doing?’ ‘I’m taking a correction shot,’ I replied.”

His playing partner asked what he called that.

“Thinking fast, I told him that I called it a ‘Mulligan.’ They laughed and let me play a second ball. After the match, which Mulligan and Spindler won by one point, there was considerable discussion in the clubhouse about that free shot.

“It all worked out amicably enough, but after that it became an unwritten rule in our foursome that you could take an extra shot on the first tee if you weren’t satisfied with your original. Naturally, this was always referred to as ‘taking a Mulligan.’ From that beginning, I guess the practice spread, and the name with it.”

Such a tale appears to be on solid footing, though USGA research hints there’s wiggle room for another “Mulligan.”

John A. “Buddy” Mulligan, a locker room attendant in the 1930s at Essex Fells CC, N.J., would finish cleaning the locker room and, if no other members appeared, play a round with assistant professional, Dave O’Connell and a club member, Des Sullivan (later golf editor of The Newark Evening News).

One day, Mulligan’s opening tee shot was bad and he beseeched O’Connell and Sullivan to allow another shot since they “had been practicing all morning,” and he had not. After the round, Mulligan proudly exclaimed to the members in his locker room for months how he received an extra shot.

The members loved it and soon began giving themselves “Mulligans” in honor of Buddy Mulligan. Sullivan began using the term in his golf pieces in The Newark Evening News. NBC’s “Today Show” ran the story in 2005.

Thus, a “Mulligan” found its niche along in our culture. Its popularity thrives because of who we are – lovers of a good story and a term that somehow fits. It thrives as we are reminded in a classic line from the 1962 John Ford Western film, “The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.”

Source: www.pga.com

Jordan Spieth failed to meet the PGA Tour’s minimum appearance requirement last season when he did not to advance to the Tour Championship. Perhaps making sure he doesn’t fall short of that number again, the three-time major winner has committed to his first career fall event in the United States.

On Friday, the Shriners Hospitals for Children Open announced that Spieth would be in this year’s field at the start of November.

“I’m really excited to be playing in the Shriners Hospitals for Children Open,” Spieth told the Las Vegas Review-Journal. “The event has been on my radar for a while, as the course has a great reputation on tour and I absolutely love the affiliation with the hospital. It’s going to be a really fun week in a great city.”

Although not meeting the 25-event perquisite is subject to a “major penalty” and fine, Andy Pazder, the chief of operations for the PGA Tour, said in Atlanta last month that the tour and Spieth had “come to a resolution” regarding the provision and promised, “I’m not going to be able to share the details of that, [but] I will say the result is something that you will see next season. It’s resolved in a way that’s going to be a win for our tournaments, our fans and golf in general.”

Other commits to the Shriners include Rickie Fowler, Bryson DeChambeau, Tony Finau and Patrick Cantlay (who is the defending champion). The Shriners begins on November 1 at TPC Summerlin in Las Vegas.

Source: golfdigest.com

Everybody wants to improve their skills. You want a better swing, the ability to hit more short-game shots and a pretty putting stroke—I get it. But if I was riding in your cart and coaching you the next time you played, I’d cut at least five shots off your score by fixing things that don’t have all that much to do with your swing mechanics. I’d focus on simpler stuff—the things that cause most players to bleed strokes over and over. I’d help you make better decisions off the tee, show you how to get out of trouble on the approach, and take a bunch of risk out of your short game. With those tweaks, you’ll be playing much closer to your potential with the game you have on the day you’re teeing it up—which should be your goal whether you’re a 20-handicapper or a tour player. Heck, if your course has a brutal starting hole like mine does, you might even save five shots by the time you get to the second tee! — With Matthew Rudy

DRIVER

Here are two ways to save strokes off the tee, because the driver can do damage to your scorecard by slicing shots, or using it when another club would be a better choice. If you slice, it’s probably because you’re body is moving too fast in relation to your arms. Change that by slowing down your body’s rotation toward the target while speeding up your arm swing. If you keep your arms moving fast, you’ll close the clubface before impact and start hitting that draw everybody wants. The other stroke saver is to use your 3-wood off the tee (below). It has more loft than the driver, making it more forgiving by reducing sidespin. And many 3-woods are adjustable like drivers, so you can tune in the ball flight you want while sacrificing only a little distance. Fifteen less yards in the fairway is preferable to hitting it longer but into somebody’s back yard.

IRONS

The secret to saving strokes is controlling the ball better. That means avoiding the grounders that don’t advance it very far and successfully getting out of trouble in one shot. Curving the ball intentionally around an obstacle is useful but hard to execute without the right plan. Start with club selection. To play a hook, use clubs with more loft (6-iron or shorter). A club with too little loft will likely drill the ball into the ground. Conversely, to hit a slice, you’ll want to use a club with less loft (hybrids and long irons). Extra loft tends to reduce the spin you need to slice a ball around trouble. As far as technique, keep it simple. The club should be open in relation to your swing path at impact to slice it and closed to hook it. The more open or closed it is in relation to the path, the more it will curve. That means you don’t have to do anything funky with your swing to curve it.

CHIPPING

You might laugh when you hear this, but my best advice about chipping from a good lie can be summed up in one word: don’t. If you’re in fairway grass with an open line to the flag, use your putter instead of a wedge. Modern agronomy has made this shot the no-brainer choice. Why risk chunking or skulling a wedge off the tightly manicured grass many courses now have. The only reason most players aren’t good at putting from off the green is because they don’t practice it, and they do a poor job getting the ball near the hole. To improve your distance control, make two practice swings—one much bigger than you think you need, and one less than you think you need—and then make your real stroke a size in between. You’ll quickly start calibrating the speed, and I can promise you that your worst putt will be way better than your worst chip.

BUNKER

The irons you play probably aren’t the same ones tour players use. Neither is the shaft in your driver. Those players use specialized equipment for their skills, including wedges with less bounce designed to take advantage of their precision in the sand. You, on the other hand, need to use a wedge in the bunker that will let you expand your margin for error. Go with one that has lots of bounce—12 degrees or more. Bounce is the feature that keeps the club from digging too deeply in the sand. You want to skim right through it. When you get the right club in your hands, make a swing concentrating on throwing a six-inch circle of sand around the ball out of the bunker. If you don’t swing very fast, the extra bounce will give you the forgiveness to strike the sand several inches behind the ball and still hit a good bunker shot. Think of how many shots that could save you.

 

Source: golfdigest.com

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YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY, BUSINESS MEETING, OR WEDDING!

Jingle bells are certainly sneaking up on us, aren’t they? Before we know it the turkey will be stuffed, the potatoes will be mashed, and it will be time to trim the tree! If this makes you get into a bit of a panic, don’t worry. Hosting your company Christmas or holiday party with us will be the easiest thing on your holiday to do list!

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To earn his first PGA Tour victory on Sunday at the Safeway Open, Kevin Tway had an uphill battle, entering the final round three shots back of leader Brandt Snedeker. After bogeying two of his first four holes, the task became virtually impossible.

But Tway remained steady, slowly creeping his way back up the leader board and getting some much needed help from Snedeker, who looked completely lost down the stretch. By the time Tway had reached the 17th tee, even without his A-game, the 30-year-old son of eight-time PGA Tour winner and major champion Bob Tway, still had an opportunity to win the tournament. Two clutch birdies on the 17th and 18th holes gave him a one-under 71, enough to get into a three-way playoff with Snedeker and Ryan Moore at 14-under 274. Tway kept it rolling in sudden death, making birdie on all three playoff holes to claim his maiden tour title.

Moore came up big late in his round as well, grabbing birdies on three of his final four holes to put him in position for a sixth career victory. But his birdie effort on the third playoff hole stopped inches short of the cup, opening the door for Tway to win with a birdie. The T-2 finish is Moore’s first since the 2016 Tour Championship, where he also lost in a playoff just six weeks after winning the John Deere Classic.

As for Snedeker, this loss will sting, especially considering he had lead the tournament by five strokes at one point on Sunday. His T-2 finish is his fifth inside the top eight in his last 11 events.

Source: golfdigest.com